Buddhist Meditation

Buddhist meditation is commonly mixed up with yogic meditation. Buddhism doesn’t propagate any stimulants, drugs, or secret teachings. This kind of meditation has to do with human consciousness as an everyday phenomenon.

Two forms of meditation

Concentration:

In this kind of meditation, the focus of the mind is on a mental object it can be anything like counting one’s own breath or looking at a candle flame, chanting a mantra ect.

Mindfulness

This is also called as awareness, here the mind observes itself this can be done while sitting and meditating. This is a concentration on a single though without wavering into other thoughts. Usually in Buddhism you can use one of the technique or combine both the techniques together.

There are many kinds of meditation formed from Buddhism. But there are two of them that are used mostly all over the world. The following is an overview of these two kinds of meditations.

Insight Meditation

This kind of meditation is also called as Vipassana or Mindfulness. This has been formed out of the Theravada Buddhist tradition that has existed in Thailand for many years. According to this method, a person keeps a watch on his/her body sensations and while doing so thought come and go. When there is a loss of attention, the person should return to his watching state again. This might seem like a simple technique but it is not so easy to do. This Watching oneself sometimes leads to profound thoughts about a person’s identity. There are many well know institutes where this is practiced all over the world.

Zen

This school has its origins from the Mahayana school of Buddhism especially in Japan and Korea. It is now a popular part of the United States and is endorsed by a lot of celebrities. In this tradition there is more emphasis on non-conceptual and non-verbal perceptions. In this type of Zen, the person should just sit with thought suspended (“sitting quietly doing nothing”).

In the other kind of school the person just keeps a watch on his/her sensations and thoughts as they appear and disappear (this is a part of Mindfulness). In the third type of Zen, the teacher of this tradition gives the person a koan or word puzzle to ponder upon. There are many Zen Centers all around the world and are very famous too. A person who practices Buddhist Mediation attends intensive programs as he moves away from residential place to a meditation center and meditates for a fixed period of time everyday.